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Tuesday, 31 January 2012

UAP CCD Logo Design Contest Entries

Entry No. 1
My logo design concept is "Familiarity and Oneness". Using the UAP logo for visual familiarity and adding CCD as the new service offered by the organization. Therefore achieving UAP and CCD combined in singularity and harmony.
Colors were chosen, aside from the concept of familiarity, from its psychological effect. Red for determination and blue for professionalism thus when combined creates high impact to viewers

















Do you like entry no. 1 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 2
The main concept of my logo proposal is the “stairs”. It symbolizes the stages or levels of development of an individual or an institution. For me as a graduate of Architecture, I know I have to go through some stages like trainings, experiences and massive amount of additional knowledge in order for me to have A higher potential to reach my career’s goal. The letters CCD forms the stairs and the tail of the “D” (2 vertical swoosh in blue and red pointing forward) serves as the “door of success”. The circles behind the CCD represent the light that leads to the stairs serving as a guide in every step. The title Center for Career Development placed above symbolizing the institution paramount goal. The United Architects of the Philippines is in the lower right to symbolize its support to CCD. Basically, I borrowed the colors and style/font of my logo proposal to the current logo of UAP not to pirate the UAP logo but to show the connection between the two. In this way, even just by seeing the logo of CCD without the UAP text, it can still be noticed easily its affiliation to the UAP.

Do you like entry no. 2 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 3
The logo design was inspired by the most sacred development known to man “ The process of fertilization”, a natural process of development involving one sperm cell uniting with one egg cell. Like the prime objective of UAP CCD which is to help future Architects develop their career to excel and become responsible professionals that will help provide humanity with beneficial designed environments.





Do you like entry no. 3 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 4

















Do you like entry no. 4 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 5
The CCD logo Design reflects the image of a shell in motion. A shell that is about to open, representing the process of purifying what inside.










Do you like entry no. 5 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 6


Arrow represent all side of avenue for learning and development of Each Architects and
color red represent the eagerness of the department to help all architects for their carreer
development.Blue color represents sky because knowledge is infinite and we as a person
continually search and explore knowledge in our everyday life.






Do you like entry no. 6 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 7

Inspired by the image of the light bulb, the ubiquitous symbol for knowledge and idea, the logo is a composite graphic comprising  of the  UAP logo as the  firmament that inspires knowledge, the text of the Center for Career Development as the grounded spiral that holds the bulb of knowledge together, and the gradiated and measured lines symbolizing the practice, and the discipline and artistry that comes with it.









Do you like entry no. 7 above for the UAP CCD logo?

Entry No. 8

"Big things are coming"













Do you like entry no. 8 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 9


CCD lightens your knowledge beyond imagination














Do you like entry no. 9 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 10


The Fusion of UAP and CCD














Do you like entry no. 10 above for the UAP CCD logo?


Entry No. 11


Vision towards success...














Do you like entry no. 11 above for the UAP CCD logo?



Other Entries will be posted soon.
Winner will receive an Architecture Licensure Exam review scholarship from UAPCCD worth P15,500.00

Saturday, 28 January 2012

How To Think Like An Architect: Improving Design

Santa Barbara Architect Barry Berkus demonstrates how he would remodel a space in order to improve the design. He illustrates this process through a series of quick drawings and diagrams, along with detailed explanations of the current conditions, and client needs.

How To Think Like An Architect: Exercising the Imagination

Santa Barbara architect Barry Berkus demonstrates how drawing from the imagination can inspire design, and a creative thinking process. The raw beginning stage to an eventually refined and polished product

How To Think Like An Architect: Designing From Organic Form

Santa Barbara architect Barry Berkus shows us how an organic form can provide inspiration for designing and drawing a building. Berkus demonstrates his preliminary thought process, producing the raw and unrefined drawings that become the conceptual stages of design.

How To Think Like An Architect: Designing From Nature

Santa Barbara based architect Barry Berkus demonstrates how nature can inspire design. This video short captures the raw beginnings of the thought process that goes into creating an architectural form out of an inspired piece.

How To Think Like An Architect: The Design Process

Santa Barbara architect Barry Berkus takes us through the process he used to design the Padaro Lane Residence in Southern California. He demonstrates his conceptual design process through a series of raw drawings and diagrams, along with a detailed explanation of the site conditions, and client needs. This preliminary diagramming stage is a necessary first step in creating a functional, and well thought out design.

Friday, 27 January 2012

38th UAP National Convention

The future is what we make of the present from what we have learned in the past. In almost four decades of the United Architects of the Philippines (UAP), there is much to be proud of – a rich history, outstanding achievements, and a growing membership with an earnest passion for excellence.

Now in the 21st century, Filipino architects have spread from the pulpy sheets of our blueprints to the glossy sheets of design magazines and beyond. We have evolved from simple practitioners to dynamic designers reflecting the dreams and desires of a progressive society.

It is but fitting to celebrate the UAP’s 38th National Convention with the theme, “Architectural Pride: Landmarks, Leadership, & Legacy.”






More information from the 38th NATCON website here.

Life on the Edge: Living with the Risks of Disasters

The world is changing fast and people can do nothing but adapt. As it continues to pose different disasters on us, we should be well-equipped not just with highly-technological equipment but most especially with knowledge. Everyone is responsible to do their part in spreading proper information regarding disasters and how to deal with them.One important thing that we must consider is disaster risk reduction—we must think of ways on how to prevent huge impacts of such natural disasters; one way, for example, is proper environmental/urban planning.

In line with this, we would like to inform you that the United Architects of the Philippines Student Auxiliary (UAPSA),in cooperation withSLIVERS Magazine, organized the "SPACE 2" nationwide seminar series entitled,"Life on the Edge: Living with the Risks of Disasters" with the guest speaker, Dr. Nathaniel von Einsiedel.

The said event will be going to four key cities in the Philippines, specifically, Iloilo, Cebu, Davao and Manila. Below are the dates and target venues:
DATE VENUE
January 26, 2012 University of San Agustin, Iloilo
January 27, 2012 University of San Carlos, Cebu
January 28, 2012 University of Mindanao, Davao
February 11, 2012 De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde, Manila

The UAPSA ManCom is going to the event’s venues. The members of the Management Committee are as follows:
•Christian N. Laxamana (UP-Diliman) National President
•Ula Pearl Guevarra (PLM) National Executive Vice President
•Ieisya Lyn U. Malig-on (TUP-Manila) Secretary-General
•Hanna B. Arcilla (UST) National Treasurer

Friday, 20 January 2012

Letter of UAP to Congress

Here's the full text of the letter sent to Congress recently with regards to the pending CE Bills in Congress:

January 18, 2012

THE HONORABLE CONGRESSMAN ANDRES D. SALVACION, JR.
Chairman
Committee on Civil Service and Professional Regulations
15th Congress House of Representatives
Batasan Hills, Quezon City, Metro Manila 1126

Dear Honorable Salvacion:

            Good day and our warmest greetings to the 15th Congress Committee on Civil Service and Professional Regulations (CCCSPR) members.

            This pertains to the concluded 15th CCCSPR Hearing held on September 26, 2011 Monday at 9:30 Room 1 & 2 Ramon V Mitra (RVM) Building. The four (4) House Bills 4071; 2200; 2797 and 4456 were unanimously approved even with the PRC representative wanting to submit a PRC Position Paper. The CCCSPR has been instructed to consolidate the four (4) HBs into one and its format and style will be addressed and subject to revision, editing and approval by the members of the CCCSPR.
           
            It is regarding this matter that the UAP would like to ask, seek and implore your kind, benevolent and just understanding and  good self, to hear our plea on matters of concern  that pertain to the HBs proposed amendments, which are being consolidated and prepared to be submitted for your review and approval. We ask that our concerns be heard and addressed with the goal to Harmonize both RA 544 Civil Engineering (CE) Law support and the RA 9266 Architecture Law as these laws have overlapping, encroaching and conflicting provisions .

            We support the Civil Engineers in their endeavor to update, upgrade, revise and improve the RA 544 with the proposed amendments that are being consolidated. However, with deep contemplative, review, perusal, and extensive discussion and analysis of the HBs proposed amendments, we would like submit Letter of Appeal and Position Paper on the said HB's  to your kind self for your perusal and consideration.

            Attached is our prayer that these matters of concern be incorporated in the Consolidated HB (CHB) to finally address and harmonize the RA 544 CE Law and RA 9266 Architecture Law and the professions that need to be united and working together. A true and lasting Professional cooperation, understanding, acknowledgment, acceptance and respect between the professionals should be promoted, cultivated and nurtured as the Design and Construction Industry needs both to work together to achieve greater heights. 
           

May we seek and ask for an audience with your good self to further explain our concerns and to ask for your kind understanding and support to put in our concerns in the Consolidated House Bill of the approved four (4) HBs 4071; 2200; 2797 and 4456.

            To be clear, let us reiterate that the UAP supports the Civil Engineers in their objectives to update, revise, upgrade and amend the RA 544 CE Law. We should work in harmony as only through a united collective effort can we truly progress in our pursuit of excellence in our chosen fields.

            Only with your kind understanding and support can this be made possible. May we rely on your fairness and just contemplative decision to integrate and add our concerns to the Consolidated House Bill that, after it passes the CCCSPR, will be scheduled and deliberated in its Second Reading at the Congress Plenary Hall.

            More power to you and your kind office, thank you.


Respectfully yours,




ARCH. RAMON S. MENDOZA, FUAP
National President 
      United Architects of the Philippines (UAP)






Attachment:
Copy of UAP Recommendations to the Proposed Bill
Letter to the Civil Service and Professional Regulations_Attachment

MOA between UAP and PICE

Year 2003. The UAP and PICE signed a joint resolution supporting the passage of Architecture and Civil Engineering bills delineating their respective scope of practice and strengthening their collaborative efforts in common goals.
The two professional groups through their leaders stressed the need for the immediate passage of their respective bills, which would benefit their hundreds of thousand members nationwide.
In Year 2004, the Architecture Act was passed and signed into law.
In Year 2005, a petition for declaratory relief filed on 3 May 2005 by the PICE and civil engineer Leo Cleto Gamolo to declare null and void Sections 302[3] and [4] of the Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations (“Revised IRR”) of Presidential Decree No. 1096 (the “National Building Code”). The said provisions require that architectural documents submitted in applications for building permits must be prepared, signed and sealed by architects. PICE, et al. claim that the said sections of the Revised IRR, by effectively prohibiting civil engineers from also preparing, signing and sealing architectural documents, are contrary to the National Building Code and the Republic Act No. 544 (the “Civil Engineering Law”), which purportedly gave civil engineers the said right.

UAP and PICE Collaboration

The following is a copy of proposed MOA for the UAP and PICE sent by an anonymous sender

ARCHITECTURE AND CIVIL ENGINEERING – COMPLEMENTARY PROFESSIONS
DRAFT MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT BETWEEN UAP AND PICE
Whereas each recognizes the other as an honoured and learned profession of equal merit whose close cooperation is essential for the benefit of the public, and in order to ensure that the special knowledge, skill and training of each profession are properly available to the public, the following points have been duly agreed upon by the Philippine Institute of Civil Engineers (PICE) and the United Architects of the Philippines (UAP) concerning the scope and practice of architecture and civil engineering for buildings
1. Principles Governing the Practice of Civil Engineering and Architecture
(a) Except as provided herein, Civil Engineers shall confine their professional activity to the practice of civil engineering and Architects to the practice of architecture.
(b) Civil Engineers and Architects are obligated to practise with professional integrity in their areas of competence in all types and sizes of buildings to the prevailing professional standards.
2. Definitions
In this Memorandum of Agreement
(a) Architect means an individual registered as an Architect under the Architecture Act of 2004.
(b) Architectural and Engineering Firm means a proprietorship, partnership or corporation that is entitled to engage in the practice of architecture or the practice of engineering under the
Architecture Act of 2004 or the Civil Engineering Act of 2012, as the case may be, and whose practice, if not so confined, involves the design of buildings and is satisfactory to the Joint Practice Board.
(c) Architectural Firm means a proprietorship, partnership or corporation that is entitled to engage in the practice of architecture under the Architecture Act of 2004 and whose practice is the provision of architectural consulting services.
(d) Assembly Occupancy means the occupancy or the use of a building, or part thereof, by a gathering of persons for civic, political, travel, religious, social, educational, recreational or like purposes, or for the consumption of food or drink.
(e) Building means any structure used or intended for supporting or sheltering any use or occupancy.
(f) Certificate of Joint Practice means a document issued either by UAP or PICE, respectively, to individuals, proprietorships, partnerships and corporations to authorize practice in the design of buildings and, providing the conditions imposed on granting of the certificate remain unchanged, shall remain valid for (1) year from the date of issuance.
(g) Coordinating Registered Professional means the Architect or Civil Engineer retained to coordinate all the design and field reviews of the Architects and Civil Engineers retained on a building.
(h) Civil Engineer means an individual registered as a Civil Engineer under the Civil Engineers Act of 2012.
(i) Civil Engineering Firm means a proprietorship, partnership or corporation entitled to engage in the practice of civil engineering under the Civil Engineers Act of 2012 and whose practice is the provision of civil engineering consulting services.
(j) Industrial Occupancy means the occupancy or use of a building, or part thereof, for the assembling, fabricating, manufacturing, processing, repairing or storing of goods and materials.
(k) Joint Practice Board means a body established jointly by UAP and PICE under Article 14.
(l) Major Occupancy means the principal occupancy for which a building, or part thereof, is used or intended to be used, and is deemed to include the subsidiary occupancies, which are an integral part of the principal occupancy.
(m) Occupancy means the use or intended use of a building, or part thereof, for the shelter or support of persons, animals or property.
(n) Prime Consultant means the individual, proprietorship, partnership or corporation who or which is directly responsible to a client for the execution of architectural and civil engineering work performed in the design and field review of a building.
3. Principles Governing the Joint Practice of Civil Engineering and Architecture
(a) In the design of buildings, Civil Engineering Firms shall have a Certificate of Joint Practice from UAP if their professional activity includes the practice of civil engineering and architecture;
Architectural Firms shall have a Certificate of Joint Practice from PICE if their activity includes the practice of architecture and civil engineering.
(b) Civil Engineers may be employed by Architects and Architectural Firms and Architects may be employed by Civil Engineers and Civil Engineering Firms.
4. Principles Governing the Choice of Prime Consultant and Coordinating Registered Professional
(a) A client is free to select the Prime Consultant of the client’s choice.
(b) A client is free to select the Coordinating Registered Professional of the client’s choice.
5. Building Occupancies
Building Occupancies for which any architectural services provided by a Civil Engineer shall be deemed to be incidental and ancillary to the practice of civil engineering are:
(a) Major industrial occupancies, which may include up to 275m² of floor area of a subsidiary assembly occupancy or up to 600m² of floor area of any other subsidiary occupancy.
(b) Major industrial occupancies of an individual tenancy within a multi-tenant building, which may include up to 275m² of floor area of a subsidiary assembly occupancy or up to 600m² of floor area of any other subsidiary occupancy. Nothing in this clause shall permit a Civil Engineer to enable someone who is not an Architect or a Civil Engineer to provide architectural services.
6. Buildings for which any engineering services provided by an Architect shall be deemed to be incidental and ancillary to the practice of architecture are:
(a) Buildings of business and personal services, mercantile, medium-hazard industrial or low-hazard industrial occupancy up to a maximum of two storeys in building height and up to 600m² of floor area; and
(b) Buildings of residential occupancy up to a maximum of three storeys in building height and up to 600m² of floor area. Nothing in this clause shall permit an Architect to provide engineering services for components which require structural design, as opposed to selection from building code tables.
7.
For building occupancies other than those covered by Articles 5 and 6, whose design and field review require, by law, the services of both Architects and Civil Engineers:
(a) Architects will be required to provide architectural services other than those which are necessarily incidental and ancillary to the civil engineering work.
(b) Civil Engineers will be required to provide civil engineering services other than those which are necessarily incidental and ancillary to the architectural work. Nothing in paragraphs 7(a) and 7(b) above shall prevent an Architect or Civil Engineer from showing on drawings the civil engineering or architectural aspects necessary for coordination purposes.
8.
(a) A Civil Engineer’s entitlement to provide incidental and ancillary architectural services shall not permit a Civil Engineer to perform all architectural services in connection with a building requiring the services of both professions.
(b) An Architect’s entitlement to provide incidental and ancillary engineering services shall not permit an Architect to perform all engineering services in connection with a building requiring the services of both professions.
9. Signing and Sealing of Drawings
(a) Architectural drawings for buildings shall be signed and sealed by an Architect (except as permitted under Article 5).
(b) Civil Engineering drawings for buildings shall be signed and sealed by Civil Engineer (except as permitted under Article 6).
10. The Practice of Civil Engineering and Architecture by Architectural Firms
An Architectural Firm shall be entitled to a Certificate of Joint Practice from PICE provided that it employs on a full-time basis one or more Civil Engineers who shall take responsibility for engineering work. The Certificate of Joint Practice granted under these circumstances entitles the Architect or Architectural Firm to hold themselves out as Architect(s) and Civil Engineer(s).
11. The Practice of Civil Engineering and Architecture by Jointly Owned Firms
A proprietorship, partnership or corporation owned by Civil Engineers and Architects, who are respectively, members of PICE and UAP, is entitled to practise both engineering and architecture under the Civil Engineers Act 0f 2012 and the Architecture Act of 2004.
12. The Practice of Civil Engineering and Architecture by Civil Engineering Firms
A Civil Engineering Firm shall be entitled to a Certificate of Joint Practice from UAP provided that it employs on a full-time basis one or more Architects who shall take responsibility for architectural work. The Certificate of Joint Practice granted under these circumstances entitles the Civil Engineer or Civil Engineering Firm to hold themselves out as Civil Engineer(s) and Architects(s).
13. Disciplinary Provisions
(a) An Architectural Firm that has been issued a Certificate of Joint Practice by PICE to practise engineering shall be subject to the disciplinary provisions of the Civil Engineers Act of 2012, Bylaws and Code of Ethics.
(b) An Engineering Firm that has been issued a Certificate of Joint Practice by UAP to practise architecture shall be subject to the disciplinary provisions of the Architecture Act, Bylaws and
Code of Ethics.
(c) A Certificate of Joint Practice issued by UAP or PICE to a proprietorship, partnership or corporation may be revoked for cause by the issuing authority.
14.
The Joint Practice Board
Concurrent with the execution of this Memorandum of Agreement, there shall be instituted a Joint Practice Board authorized to deal with matters of common concern and jurisdiction and to make recommendations to UAP and PICE. The Board shall be composed of an equal number of Architects and Civil Engineers appointed by UAP and PICE, respectively. The Chair shall be appointed by mutual consent. Each member of the Joint Practice Board shall have one vote.
15.
The terms of reference of the Joint Practice Board shall include:
(a) working on matters of interprofessional relations, including, for example, the coordination and publication of guidelines, standards, criteria and performance standards in the field of building design and construction, formulated either jointly or severally by UAP and PICE;
(b) reviewing the terms of this Agreement and, from time to time as necessary, recommending changes to the points of this Agreement for consideration by the Councils of UAP and PICE; and
(c) such other matters as may be decided from time to time by UAP and PICE together.
16. Modification of this Memorandum of Agreement
It is agreed that this Memorandum of Agreement may be modified at any time by mutual consent of the Councils of UAP and PICE.
17. Terms of this Memorandum of Agreement
This Memorandum of Agreement shall remain in force by the mutual consent of the Councils of PICE and UAP.
18. Implementation of this Memorandum of Agreement
(a) It is understood by UAP and PICE that amendments to the Architecture Act of 2004 and the Civil Engineers Act of 2012 will be required in concert to facilitate enforcement of this or a subsequent Memorandum of Agreement.
(b) It is understood and agreed that the success and effectiveness of this Memorandum of Agreement will depend largely on goodwill between UAP and PICE.
(c) It is understood and agreed that (while some situations will be resolved on their own merit)
UAP and PICE generally will view contravention of the other association’s statute to constitute unprofessional conduct.
Entered into this ___ day of ____2012, at Manila Philippines.
_________________ (UAP President) _________________(PICE President)
United Architects of the Philippines and Philippine Institute of Civil Engineers

Regional Trial Court Ruling

Compare the decision of the Court of Appeals with the initial ruling made by the Manila Regional Trial Court Branch 22 that validated the questioned provisions, specifically paragraphs 3 and 4 of Section 302 of the Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of Presidential Decree 1096, otherwise known as the National Building Code of the Philippines.

RTC Decision

Court Order

Tuesday, 17 January 2012

Court of Appeals Decision regarding signing of architectural plans

The Court of Appeals, in its Decision dated 5 January 2012, granted the appeal of PICE and reversed the Decision of the Regional Trial Court.

Here's a copy of the decision:

Part 1

Part 2

Sunday, 15 January 2012

10 TYPES OF PAINT PROBLEMS

10 TYPES OF PAINT PROBLEMS....

1. CHALKING

Chalking is identifiable as a fine chalky powder . Exposure to the sun and rain, excessive chalking can be a paint failure. Chalking is actually the paint pigment released by the paint binders which have been broken down by exposure to the weather. This paint problem is due to:

-Not properly sealing a porous surface before painting.

2. BUBBLING

Bubbling defined as “a globular body of air or gas formed within a liquid: air bubbles rising to a surface.” Bubbling paint is identified by different sized bubbles formed under the paint due to:

- Painting when the concrete is damp causing trapped moisture to expand the paint.

- Interior moisture escaping through the walls due to improper interior ventilation.

- Not properly sealing a porous surface before painting.



3. MILDEW

Mildew is a fungus feeding and growing on the paint and is identifiable by its grey, brown, green or dark black "splotchy" spots. This is due to not priming the surface properly before painting and applying paint on damp surface.

4. SAGGING

Sagging of paint is easily identified as a dripping look to areas of the paint. Its potential cause is that paint surface was not clean or properly prepared at the time of application.

5. CRACKING

Cracking is a failure of paint by splitting of a dry paint. In its early stages, the problem appears as hairline cracks, this is due to natural aging of several layers of based paint and later on turns into flaking of paint.

6. EFFLORESENCE

Effloresence is identifiable by crusty white salt deposits that bubble through the paint from a masonry structure. Salts in the concrete become dissolved with water and then leach to the surface as the water evaporates. This happens when:

- there are cracks in masonry wall;

- Poor paint surface preparation where prior efflorescence was not entirely removed and washed before the surface was repainted.

- Heavy moisture migrating through exterior masonry walls

7. PEELING

Peeling paint is a very common paint problem but can be caused either by moisture or poor adhesion. Peeling due to poor adhesion is characterized by the paint peeling and separating from an earlier paint layer (intercoat peeling) or from the substrate leaving some paint behind. Its potential cause is painting over a surface with poor surface preparation such as being dirty, wet or using inadequate primer.

8. POOR ALKALI RESISTANCE

Surface with poor alkali resistance will eventually lead to color loss and overall deterioration of paint . This is due to applying paint on surface that is not properly cured/ sealed. In other cases, sometimes this is due to structures near salty water. ( The concrete absorbs salt and will pull the moisture out of the air causing the paint to fail.)

9. WRINKLING

Wrinkling is like a rough, crinkled paint surface. Its possible cause are application of paint on contaminated surface such as: dirt, wax , damp.

10. FADING OF COLOR

Fading of color is an excessive lightening of the paint color from its original color. This is due to application of paint to alkaline masonry without primer or sealer.

Saturday, 14 January 2012

Determining Allowable Maximum Volume of Building (AMVB)

ALLOWABLE MAXIMUM VOLUME OF BUILDING (AMVB) Above-Grade – The limit of the total volume of space that can be occupied by a proposed building/structure above grade level. the AMVB is an imaginary prism within the fully enclosed areas and courts of a proposed building/structure shall fit.

Quantifying the AMVB. The AMVB shall be primarily determined by the following:

a. Multiply the AMBF (in square meters) for the lot by the applicable BHL (in meters) for the lot to arrive at the initial AMVB (in cubic meters); the result of this step is the imaginary footprint prism;

b. Superimpose the angular plane originating from the center of the RROW on the footprint prism; this shall result in the reduction of the initially computed building volume due to the application of incremental setbacks and of roof configuration dictated by the angular plane; the result of this step is the AMVB;

c. To crosscheck the AMVB against the Allowable Maximum TGFA (separately determined), convert the AMVB into its approximate area equivalent (in sq. meters) by dividing it with the BHL. Before converting the AMVB to its area component, check for the effects of the incremental setbacks on the TGFA for each floor of the proposed building/structure.



ENROLL NOW AT THE UAP CENTER FOR CAREER DEVELOPMENT FOR A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW ON RULES 7 & 8 DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS!!! CONTACT 02-4126364

Sunday, 8 January 2012

Determining AMBF & PSO (R-1 & R-2)

The following rules shall be observed in the determination of the Allowable Maximum Building Footprint (AMBF) for buildings and related habitable structures. If the stated rules are compared with

a) Rule VIII Table VIII.1.- Reference Table on Percentage of Site Occupancy and Maximum Allowable Construction Area (MACA);

b) Rule VIII Tables VIII.2. and VIII.3. (setbacks, yards and courts); or

c) with the applicable stipulations under this Rule and with the applicable stipulations of the Fire Code,

the more stringent but applicable regulation out of the aforementioned rules should be observed.



ENROLL NOW AT THE UAP CENTER FOR CAREER DEVELOPMENT FOR A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW ON RULES 7 & 8 DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS!!! CONTACT 02-4126364

Saturday, 7 January 2012

Logo Design Contest for UAPCCD

UAPCCD launches a logo design contest open to all architecture students and architecture graduates. A scholarship for the Architecture Review Course awaits the winners.

Monday, 2 January 2012

June 2012 Architecture Board Exam Review Classes


The UAP Center for Career Development announces the schedule for the Review Classes which will start on February 6, 2012. The scheduled date for the examination is June 8 and 10, 2012.

 
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